Temples without Tantrums: How to make it interesting for kids

Temples without Tantrums – sounds unrealistic, right?

If you’re going anywhere in Asia, then you are going to come across a temple or two that you’d like to visit. But after Temple #1 (and let’s face it, minute 8 of Temple #1) how do you keep their imagination fired? Here’s our guide to a few little tricks that have worked for us throughout the years. Most temples have no issues with you taking photos but there are usually some areas which are sacrosanct. In these areas, taking photos is frowned upon.  Always turn the flash off, even if you’re not in a sacrosanct area.

Temples for Toddlers

Help them to spot how many buddhas, elephants, dragons or whatever mystical creatures they can find. Tell them that you need to find 20 in each Temple to help Ryder from Paw Patrol (or choose their favourite TV character). Take a picture of them with the twentieth Buddha and say that’s great. Mission accomplished.

Get them to remember the path back in the style of Dora The Explorer. Go left at the Monkey, then through the big drum tower, over the stream, etc etc.

Get them to say a prayer or if you’re agnostic or atheist then get them to say a thought out loud for everyone of their family in each part of the Temple.

Temples for Tweens

Ask them to imagine what went on in years past and hold vivid conversations about it. If these walls could speak ….

Did the monks ever hide people here? Why would they hide people? Did they take in stray animals? Where would they have kept them? Find a room that looks best for that purpose.

Ask them to notice things about the building of the Temple that might have allowed it to withstand natural disasters like earthquakes. How have these buildings survived? What materials have they used?

Temples for Teens

Ask them to collate ten photographs which make this Temple different to others. Find the uniqueness.

Ask them to take a selfie with the most interesting sculpture they find.

 

 

 

 

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